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Changing Colors

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Change.”

hauling, boat, fall, colors, change, daily press, photo challenge

Going to the boathouse for the Winter in Charlevoix, Michigan

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“When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.” 
–Dr. Wayne Dyer

–More about Dr. Wayne Dyer at drwaynedyer.com/blog/success-secrets/

If you like this post, please share with your friends on facebook!
Thank you,
~~Tresa

Photography by Meyer Clark Studio 2015

Light My Sapphire!

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Summertime Blues ~

The photo collage above is inspired by the painting by Kathleen Chaney Fritz, “Day at the Big Lake – Grand Haven, Michigan”. I’ve had a few dreams this Summer about walking down a white sandy beach, when something very sparkly catches the warm sunlight.
I was so surprised to find blue crystals in pointed rock formations! I felt an immediate sense of panic—trying to imagine how I was gonna’ lug all the stones home in my beach bag—and then I woke up! Since then, I’ve had a few opportunities to stroll down the beaches on Lake Michigan to capture a sunset. Fast-forward to now, well, it’s September, and time to share my research about the beloved blue gemstone, Sapphire. No, I don’t think we can find a Sapphire on the beach in Michigan, maybe just blue sea glass and a Petoskey Stone. If you want to go to where Sapphires are mined, buy a ticket to Montana, Sri Lanka, Africa, Eastern Australia, China, Thailand, or Madagascar.

The Gemstone of Rainbows ~
According to my favorite jewelry store, The Miners Den, Sapphires come from the gemstone variety of the mineral corundum, wherein the trace elements present during its formation give it its color: iron, titanium, chromium, copper, and magnesium create blue, yellow, purple, orange, and green respectively. In addition to the purple, chromium impurities can also yield pink or red corundum. (This red corundum is called “ruby”, and all stones marketed as “red sapphires” have been heat-treated to create the deep red you see.) Depending how much Chromium is in the mineral will determine what gemstone it becomes. Sapphires are mined in many shades of gray, black and clear. The real deal however, is vibrant blue Sapphire.

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Sapphire ring, beverly hills

Blue Sapphire Ring by Anup Jogani, Beverly Hills, Ca

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Pink sapphire ring

Pink Sapphire Ring by Pompeii3

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How do I know if my Sapphire is authentic, synthetic or simulated?
• Sapphires are next after the diamond on the Mohs hardness scale of 9.
• Natural Sapphires should come with a Certificate to prove the stone’s origin.
• A natural Sapphire will have inclusions visible with a Jewelers loupe.
• A clear, natural Sapphire, with no inclusions is very rare and extremely valuable.
• Synthetic or lab-created Sapphires are heat-treated to enhance color.
• Sapphires comes in many colors of the rainbow, and can be referred to as “Fancy”
• Simulated Sapphires come from quartz or tourmaline and are heat-treated.

Light My Sapphire ~
rare sapphire
On August 29, 1984, an article from The Wall Street Journal was published about heat-treated gemstones. It helped to fire a thunderstorm of animosity by the gem industry, because it was not well-known that precious gemstones were heat-treated. The orange-pink Sapphire, Padparadscha, also derived from Corundum, are extremely rare and totally natural, with no sign of artificial heat-treatment. Mined now in Vietnam and Eastern Africa, these amazing gems can be worth more than the very finest blue Sapphires. Can you believe $50,000 per carat!

Now you know that a Sapphire is not only a blue stone. I was watching Jewelry TV last week, when they mentioned a Pink Sapphire, calling it “Morganite” from Beryl. But we know now, Sapphires come from the mineral Corundum, not Beryl.

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MORGANITE, Pompeii3, sapphire

A Morganite Ring by Pompeii3

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Thank you for reading my research & rantings! You are truly awesome!
Make my day sparkle and please share my blog with your friends on Facebook.
Dankeschön!

~~Tresa

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Shades of Celebration at Northport

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Monochromatic.”

As a graphic designer, my eye is trained to automatically find contrast and balance in my compositions. This image of a fireworks display from the fourth of July this year, has a rich gradation of pink to burgundy. Even though this shot is monochromatic, it is still full of color and energy. Capturing this color on my iPhone was surprising to me.

What surprising photos have you uncovered this Summer?

~~Tresa

Northport, Marina, Fireworks, red pink summer, 2015, tresameyerclark, nautical, Great lakes, Lake Michigan,

July 4, Northport, Michigan 2015 by T. Meyer Clark

Back to School Connection

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Connected.”

 

Starting out in the world as a first-grader can be frightening, but not in Germany. Parents help their children make the transition from kindergarten to primary school more enticing. They give them a “schultuete” or school cone. The large cone is decorated and filled with candy and gifts.

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Candy Cone

Ceramics and Photo Styling of the Schultuete by Tresa Meyer Clark

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A Little History
My Oma (Grandma in German) gave me a photograph of my Dad on his first day of primary school, holding his schultuete, in Hamburg, Germany in the 1940’s.

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School Candy Cone

Hamburg, Germany

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The expression on his face is priceless. That photo inspired me to create a collage, and a ceramic piece, as pictured above in a shadow box display. Spending creative time to stylize all the German items my Grandparents saved over the years is one of my favorite ways to decorate. As a graphic artist, combining old hand-written letters from Europe and postcard memorabilia helps me to connect the past to the present in a collage.
A way to capture the light, or bring the old stuff up from the basement storage and make it meaningful again.

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the water and boats in Germany

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first grade, photo, 1960's, retouched, back to school, school portrait, tresa meyer clark

Tresa Meyer

Just for giggles, here is my first-grade portrait. I took the time today to retouch it for spots and crinkles. Obviously my parents had great sense of style. ( :

~~~Tresa

 

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Nature’s Jewel

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge:
“From Every Angle.”

The tiny single flower caught my eye along side of the dock.
I’m glad I took the time to photograph this. Looking forward to seeing how it’s changing, or if there are more, later in September.

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A close-up, side view of the tiny flower in Lake Charlevoix, Mi

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Tiny Trumpet Flower

A tiny slipper shaped flower growing in water next to the dock.

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A look inside the pretty speckled yellow and orange flower.

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After further research, I decided to reference, Artfire.com. where I found the definition of the flower, and its medicinal uses by Bonnie Klisiewicz Bartley.

“The Jewel weed grows up to five feet tall and likes a cool shady environment,
often along a river bank. There is a clear, liquid inside the stems and along the
nodes. This sappy liquid is often applied to the skin as a relief for various irritations
like poison ivy and insect bites. The morning dew sparkles on the leaves like little jewels because they are water-repellent, thus giving it the name, Jewel Weed.”

iPhone Photography by Tresa Meyer Clark.
Meyer Clark Studio 2015

To Learn More about Bonnie Klisiewicz Bartley, the “Soapsmith”, visit her facebook page.