March Birthstone

bloodstone

Bloodstone

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The second in command birthstone for March is Bloodstone. Aquamarine is the modern-day stone, and as much as I love it, I like to learn about the stones we would only see by visiting a local rock shop. Bloodstone is the ancient or traditional stone believed to have metaphysical properties with its mineral content being quartz or chalcedony.

 

mineral Book,

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This is a vintage rock and mineral book I’ve had for a very long time.
Another little treasure!

See you next month when I dig up some info on the diamond.
Thanks for stopping by. Comments and sharing welcome.

~~Tresa

 

 

Purple Stones

Amethyst is February’s Birthstone. I always love to dig up something unusual, but this month, Amethyst stands alone. There is no other gemstone for February.

A lot of people love the color purple, and  it looks fabulous with gold. I’ve been designing with variety of amethyst and tanzanite stones. My pieces are very earthy with the warm jasper tones that are a nice surprise with the sparkle of purple stones.

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Gold chain, Necklace, Amethyst, birthstone, purplestone, tresaMeyerClark, hornbone, pendant, artisan jewelry

Amethyst and Tanzanite Necklace by MeyerClarkCreative

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amethyst geode, stone slice, gemstone, purple

Photo from The Crystal Castle

Amethyst is quartz. It ranges in color from pale to deep purple. Bands of color are common in specimens from some regions. Heating amethyst causes the color to change to yellow or gold, turning the amethyst into citrine!

Whatever colors I’m inspired by, originality is the key to creating. I strive to employ my best hand-picked beads in every piece. I want you to feel happy that you’ve made a personal choice when wearing and giving one-of-a-kind artisan jewelry.

If you want to see more of my jewelry and here more about my story, go to MeyerClarkCreative on Etsy.com.

Thanks for reading and sharing.
~~~~ Tresa

Rosie Outlook

 

Being optimistic is not always easy.
Staying positive is not always a matter of focus. Training my brain as an artist to see things in a different light, rearranged, contrast from dark to light, and opposites, can have a healing effect. Immersing myself into my garden around the bees and weeds is important to me, and can be very therapeutic as well.

Rose Quartz rock

Rose Quartz promises to bring love.

While planting mint for tea drinking, I was surprised to find three rose quartz stones in my garden on two separate occasions! I’m sure whoever planted them was an optimist about finding love!

I’m certain it helped me too.

Challenging my design skills keeps me positive.
Recently, Pantonethe global authority on color, announced the colors for 2016; Rose Quartz and Serene Blue. Inspired by this color combination and our Michigan sunsets, I gathered up my beads and coordinated rose quartz with blue gemstones. This necklace is a new listing in my Etsy shop. According to common gemstone lore, rose quartz crystals can provide help in keeping a positive outlook, help with insomnia, and has a balancing effect on emotions. It is also the alternative to the garnet for January birthstones.

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rose quartz and serene blue gemstone jewelry

Jewelry Design by Meyer Clark Creative

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Being optimistic can be life-changing.
Positive thinking keeps you motivated and energetic, pursuing what you want with ambition, confidence and happiness. According to successconsciousness.com —how-to-be-optimistic—It helps you focus on your vision, and makes everyday a happy day.

Thank you so much for reading and sharing! Yes, sharing is positive! Tweet Tweet!

~~Tresa

Today’s journal was in response to The Daily Post’s photo-challenge, Optimistic.

October’s Electric Stone

Opal, rough stone, october, blogging101, tresameyerclark,

“According to ancient legend the Opal was considered to be the most mysterious and bewitching of all gemstones, because it was believed to have all the virtues of other precious stones within. Opals were believed to boost the joy of one’s earthly existence.” redcjewels.com

 

October is a month full of color in Michigan, and the birthstone is Opal, which seems fitting with its kaleidoscopic of colors and glints of rainbow flecks.

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As you may know, I like to explore the what is “not so known” about each birthstone. Since Pink Tourmaline is also an October birthstone, I have found Black Tourmaline to be much more intriguing.

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black tourmaline, October, gemstone

Schorl or Black Tourmaline is Electric

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In a village in Saxony, Germany called Zschorlau or “Schorl”, ancient magicians used Black Tourmaline, known as Schorl, to protect them from evil in their spiritual rituals. Nearby there was a tin mine where black tourmaline was found. I find it amazing that in other parts of the world, Native Americans and African shamans included black tourmaline in rituals as protection against negative spells or curses as well.

Black tourmaline is an electric stone. “Scientists worldwide have long been intrigued by the unique electrical and magnetic properties of tourmaline. American statesman and inventor Benjamin Franklin, possessed at least one tourmaline stone and is said to have used it in his experiments (he invented the lightening rod). In Europe in 1880, Pierre Curie and his brother Jacques, a mineralogist, discovered that tourmaline carries a weak electric charge when it is heated (pyroelectricity) or when pressure is applied to its surface (piezoelectricity). Later, research in Japan confirmed that tourmaline carries a faint but constant electric charge of 0.06mA, which is why tourmaline continues to be known as the electric stone, especially in Asia. Japanese researchers also found that no matter how small tourmaline is ground or crushed, it is still capable of conveying an electric current.”
—- http://www.eyeofhorus.biz

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stone, Black Tourmaline, Quartz, tresa meyerclark, jewelry design

Black Tourmaline in Quartz

 Swarovksi, arrow head, spike, quartz, gemstone, velvet necklace, Jewelry Design, Tresa Meyer Clark, tourmaline,

Handcrafted jewelry by Tresa

 

I hope you learned something new about the October birthstones.

Thanks for reading, you are awesome!

Please share with your friends on Facebook and Twitter!

~~~Tresa

 

Light My Sapphire!

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Summertime Blues ~

The photo collage above is inspired by the painting by Kathleen Chaney Fritz, “Day at the Big Lake – Grand Haven, Michigan”. I’ve had a few dreams this Summer about walking down a white sandy beach, when something very sparkly catches the warm sunlight.
I was so surprised to find blue crystals in pointed rock formations! I felt an immediate sense of panic—trying to imagine how I was gonna’ lug all the stones home in my beach bag—and then I woke up! Since then, I’ve had a few opportunities to stroll down the beaches on Lake Michigan to capture a sunset. Fast-forward to now, well, it’s September, and time to share my research about the beloved blue gemstone, Sapphire. No, I don’t think we can find a Sapphire on the beach in Michigan, maybe just blue sea glass and a Petoskey Stone. If you want to go to where Sapphires are mined, buy a ticket to Montana, Sri Lanka, Africa, Eastern Australia, China, Thailand, or Madagascar.

The Gemstone of Rainbows ~
According to my favorite jewelry store, The Miners Den, Sapphires come from the gemstone variety of the mineral corundum, wherein the trace elements present during its formation give it its color: iron, titanium, chromium, copper, and magnesium create blue, yellow, purple, orange, and green respectively. In addition to the purple, chromium impurities can also yield pink or red corundum. (This red corundum is called “ruby”, and all stones marketed as “red sapphires” have been heat-treated to create the deep red you see.) Depending how much Chromium is in the mineral will determine what gemstone it becomes. Sapphires are mined in many shades of gray, black and clear. The real deal however, is vibrant blue Sapphire.

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Sapphire ring, beverly hills

Blue Sapphire Ring by Anup Jogani, Beverly Hills, Ca

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Pink sapphire ring

Pink Sapphire Ring by Pompeii3

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How do I know if my Sapphire is authentic, synthetic or simulated?
• Sapphires are next after the diamond on the Mohs hardness scale of 9.
• Natural Sapphires should come with a Certificate to prove the stone’s origin.
• A natural Sapphire will have inclusions visible with a Jewelers loupe.
• A clear, natural Sapphire, with no inclusions is very rare and extremely valuable.
• Synthetic or lab-created Sapphires are heat-treated to enhance color.
• Sapphires comes in many colors of the rainbow, and can be referred to as “Fancy”
• Simulated Sapphires come from quartz or tourmaline and are heat-treated.

Light My Sapphire ~
rare sapphire
On August 29, 1984, an article from The Wall Street Journal was published about heat-treated gemstones. It helped to fire a thunderstorm of animosity by the gem industry, because it was not well-known that precious gemstones were heat-treated. The orange-pink Sapphire, Padparadscha, also derived from Corundum, are extremely rare and totally natural, with no sign of artificial heat-treatment. Mined now in Vietnam and Eastern Africa, these amazing gems can be worth more than the very finest blue Sapphires. Can you believe $50,000 per carat!

Now you know that a Sapphire is not only a blue stone. I was watching Jewelry TV last week, when they mentioned a Pink Sapphire, calling it “Morganite” from Beryl. But we know now, Sapphires come from the mineral Corundum, not Beryl.

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MORGANITE, Pompeii3, sapphire

A Morganite Ring by Pompeii3

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Thank you for reading my research & rantings! You are truly awesome!
Make my day sparkle and please share my blog with your friends on Facebook.
Dankeschön!

~~Tresa

August Treasures

Say hello to August and the birthstone Peridot.

Imagine a beach that sparkles with the crystals of Peridot. On the Island of Oahu, it is so very treasured, that the people have illuminated many beaches by adding tiny grains of light green crystals.

SilverRushStyle

Photo by SilverRushStyle on Etsy

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A Little History

Miners have found Peridot in volcanic rocks and even meteors that landed on Earth. It is the only gemstone that comes in one color, and is not heat-treated to alter the color, as many gemstones are. Because it is sensitive to fast changes in temperature, it is not advisable to clean Peridot with an ultrasonic method.

Since 1500 B.C. valuable Peridot was mined near Egypt, on St. Johns Island, in the Red Sea. However, it was nearly depleted up to the time WW1 began. Later, it became more abundant in 1994 after a mine was discovered in Pakistan, west of the Himalayan Mountains. Today, in Arizona, 90% of the worlds Peridot comes from the San Carlos Apache Reservation, a very large source, which is mined only by the Apache Indians.

Peridot can be found in museums all over the world, with the largest on display at the Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C., containing 310 carats. The second largest documented display is the Shrine of the Magi with 200 carats. It is located in the Dom, a Gothic Cathedral in Cologne, Germany. In 1988, I viewed the breathtaking shrine which is a reliquary for the Wise Men or Three Kings who visited the birth of Jesus.

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Magi in Cologne

Shrine of the Magi, Cologne, Germany

Traveling in Europe left a big impression on me, it was amazing and unforgettable. For me, it is easier to understand and remember history when art plays an important role in our world.

Interested in learning more about birthstones and fun factoids? Great! Next month it’s all about the amazing blue Sapphire.

~~~Tresa

 

Research from www.vivalachi.com

A Ruby is King, not Pink

It just seems fitting that July is the most celebrated gemstone in history, and it’s mentioned more in the Bible than any other stone. The ruby is known as the “King of Gemstones” because it the hardest level of 9.0 on Moh’s scale, second in line to a diamond. Its mineral properties are corundum which make it red. All rubies have inclusions unless they are heat-treated or synthetic. Only true red corundum can be called a ruby, if it is pink, it’s called a sapphire.

Auf wiedersehen July, it was great!
Looking forward to August.

~~Tresa

Photo by Tresa Meyer-Clark 

July Birthstone

A pink ruby is not a ruby, it’s a Sapphire.