A Treasured Prayer

The Lord’s Prayer is the Bible verse that we all know well.
This is a beautiful sample of the prayer in German on a wax form. My Oma gave it to me. Today, it is one of my treasured items along with many things
that make me smile and help me remember her.

the lords prayer

 

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Mathew 6:9-13
Our Father, which art in heaven,
Hallowed be thy Name.
Thy Kingdom come.
Thy will be done in earth,
As it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread.
And forgive us our trespasses,
As we forgive them that trespass against us.
And lead us not into temptation,
But deliver us from evil.
For thine is the kingdom,
The power, and the glory,
For ever and ever.
Amen.

embroidered handkerchief

My Oma, German for Grandma, always appreciated beautiful things like this embroidered
handkerchief. I wonder if she ever really used it. She probably just admired it, as I do.

What do you hold near and dear, and does it inspire you to write or photograph it?

Thank you for stopping by! Comments welcome.

Happy Easter, and God Bless.

~~Tresa

This post was inspired by The Daily Post  photo challenge “Half Light” and Blogging University on WordPress.

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Changing Colors

In response to The Daily Post’s weekly photo challenge: “Change.”

hauling, boat, fall, colors, change, daily press, photo challenge

Going to the boathouse for the Winter in Charlevoix, Michigan

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“When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change.” 
–Dr. Wayne Dyer

–More about Dr. Wayne Dyer at drwaynedyer.com/blog/success-secrets/

If you like this post, please share with your friends on facebook!
Thank you,
~~Tresa

Photography by Meyer Clark Studio 2015

Light My Sapphire!

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Summertime Blues ~

The photo collage above is inspired by the painting by Kathleen Chaney Fritz, “Day at the Big Lake – Grand Haven, Michigan”. I’ve had a few dreams this Summer about walking down a white sandy beach, when something very sparkly catches the warm sunlight.
I was so surprised to find blue crystals in pointed rock formations! I felt an immediate sense of panic—trying to imagine how I was gonna’ lug all the stones home in my beach bag—and then I woke up! Since then, I’ve had a few opportunities to stroll down the beaches on Lake Michigan to capture a sunset. Fast-forward to now, well, it’s September, and time to share my research about the beloved blue gemstone, Sapphire. No, I don’t think we can find a Sapphire on the beach in Michigan, maybe just blue sea glass and a Petoskey Stone. If you want to go to where Sapphires are mined, buy a ticket to Montana, Sri Lanka, Africa, Eastern Australia, China, Thailand, or Madagascar.

The Gemstone of Rainbows ~
According to my favorite jewelry store, The Miners Den, Sapphires come from the gemstone variety of the mineral corundum, wherein the trace elements present during its formation give it its color: iron, titanium, chromium, copper, and magnesium create blue, yellow, purple, orange, and green respectively. In addition to the purple, chromium impurities can also yield pink or red corundum. (This red corundum is called “ruby”, and all stones marketed as “red sapphires” have been heat-treated to create the deep red you see.) Depending how much Chromium is in the mineral will determine what gemstone it becomes. Sapphires are mined in many shades of gray, black and clear. The real deal however, is vibrant blue Sapphire.

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Sapphire ring, beverly hills

Blue Sapphire Ring by Anup Jogani, Beverly Hills, Ca

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Pink sapphire ring

Pink Sapphire Ring by Pompeii3

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How do I know if my Sapphire is authentic, synthetic or simulated?
• Sapphires are next after the diamond on the Mohs hardness scale of 9.
• Natural Sapphires should come with a Certificate to prove the stone’s origin.
• A natural Sapphire will have inclusions visible with a Jewelers loupe.
• A clear, natural Sapphire, with no inclusions is very rare and extremely valuable.
• Synthetic or lab-created Sapphires are heat-treated to enhance color.
• Sapphires comes in many colors of the rainbow, and can be referred to as “Fancy”
• Simulated Sapphires come from quartz or tourmaline and are heat-treated.

Light My Sapphire ~
rare sapphire
On August 29, 1984, an article from The Wall Street Journal was published about heat-treated gemstones. It helped to fire a thunderstorm of animosity by the gem industry, because it was not well-known that precious gemstones were heat-treated. The orange-pink Sapphire, Padparadscha, also derived from Corundum, are extremely rare and totally natural, with no sign of artificial heat-treatment. Mined now in Vietnam and Eastern Africa, these amazing gems can be worth more than the very finest blue Sapphires. Can you believe $50,000 per carat!

Now you know that a Sapphire is not only a blue stone. I was watching Jewelry TV last week, when they mentioned a Pink Sapphire, calling it “Morganite” from Beryl. But we know now, Sapphires come from the mineral Corundum, not Beryl.

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MORGANITE, Pompeii3, sapphire

A Morganite Ring by Pompeii3

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Thank you for reading my research & rantings! You are truly awesome!
Make my day sparkle and please share my blog with your friends on Facebook.
Dankeschön!

~~Tresa

A Ruby is King, not Pink

It just seems fitting that July is the most celebrated gemstone in history, and it’s mentioned more in the Bible than any other stone. The ruby is known as the “King of Gemstones” because it the hardest level of 9.0 on Moh’s scale, second in line to a diamond. Its mineral properties are corundum which make it red. All rubies have inclusions unless they are heat-treated or synthetic. Only true red corundum can be called a ruby, if it is pink, it’s called a sapphire.

Auf wiedersehen July, it was great!
Looking forward to August.

~~Tresa

Photo by Tresa Meyer-Clark 

July Birthstone

A pink ruby is not a ruby, it’s a Sapphire.

A Lonesome Rose

Pin Rose

I Painted Today. Pink Petals. This is it. I know it’s a photo, but it moves me like a beautiful painting. This rose is my June Rose. It comes from a very thorny stem with only two flowers. The lonely Rose, I’ll never forget you, even as you fade. Thorny stem, I’ll wait to see your next move, next season or next year. Maybe I’ll find a better spot for you to grow.

Thorny stem

Perfect Pin Rose

Rose Complete

Roses photo by Tresa

Roses in the crystal vase Oma gave me.